ISSUE
5/5

Resource recovery centre

Waipā has an opportunity to give more unwanted household items a new lease on life, reducing waste and keeping it out of landfill.

At the moment, items like leftover building materials, clothing, scrap metal, concrete and other second-hand items are thrown away that could be reused. 

Waipā's made leaps and bounds since we introduced recycling back in 2012, but we've got an opportunity to do more to reduce the amount of waste heading to landfill!

 


You told us...

Community feedback was overwhelming in support for this. The Centre will give unwanted household items a new lease on life, reducing waste and keeping it out of landfill.

The preferred option was to partner with a community organisation or group to develop a resource recovery centre which would service the District. For this option we would work with a community organisation, charitable group or iwi partner to set up a resource recovery centre in an existing building on an industrial or commercial site. This option has been budgeted for in the proposed LTP.


The 2021-31 Long Term Plan will be adopted by Council in June 2021.


 

THE OPTIONS

Our proposal for the next 10 years 

Let's look at the options in more detail:

  • Status quo - no new investment
  • Joint venture with private transfer stations to add resource recovery services to their existing operations. 
  • Partner with a community organisation or group to develop a resource recovery centre
  • Partner with community organisation to develop a resource recovery centre in a purpose built building

OPTION 1:

Status quo - no new investment

 

OPTION 2

Joint venture with private transfer stations to add resource recovery services to their existing operations. 

This option:

  • Is low-cost at $28,000 per year to maintain public access to the Cambridge transfer station.

But:

  • Does not support Waipā achieving its waste reduction targets – potentially the district could in fact increase its waste
  • Offers limited options for residents to manage their waste
  • Relies on both private transfer stations to continue to operate in Te Awamutu and Cambridge
  • Relies on local charity and community groups to develop resource recovery capacity at charity shops, which limits the type of items that can be sold.
 

This option:

  • Is low-cost at $160,000 per year with potential to reduce over time as any future services start to create revenue
  • Provides more local options for the community to manage waste
  • Could track tonnes of waste diverted away from landfill

But:

  • Relies on both private transfer stations to continue to operate in Te Awamutu and Cambridge
  • Assumes transfer stations have physical space and willingness to provide the recovery service

COST:

 

COST:

$281,225

 

$1,799,840

impact on rates:

 

impact on rates:

Year 1 = $25,000
Year 2 = $25,700
Year 3 = $26,350
Year 4-10 yearly average = $29,168

 

Year 1 = $160,000
Year 2 = $164,480
Year 3 = $168,640
Year 4-10 yearly average = $186,674

Impact on debt:

 

Impact on debt:

$0

 

$0

In summary:

 

In summary:

The option is currently in place with Council providing $28,000 annually as a subsidy to maintain minimum public access to the privately-owned Cambridge transfer station.  Another private transfer station operates in Te Awamutu, which receives no subsidy.

It’s important to recognise that local charity / community groups are working to develop resource recovery through charity shops as a means of fundraising.

 

For this option, Council would work with the existing private transfer stations in Cambridge and Te Awamutu to increase their on-site services and introduce resource recovery options.

 

 

OPTION 3:

Partner with a community organisation or group to develop a resource recovery centre

 

OPTION 4:

Partner with community organisation to develop a resource recovery centre in a purpose built building 

This option:

  • Creates employment opportunities with about seven full time staff (or equivalent) over time
  • Provides more local options for the community to manage waste
  • Could track tonnes of waste diverted away from landfill
  • Provides more opportunities to educate and support the community to reuse, repurpose and recover resources from waste
  • Supports strong community partnerships built around a shared kaupapa of waste minimisation
  • Overtime, provides cost saving opportunities for residents as they divert their waste instead of relying on landfilling

But:

  • Relies on Council sourcing a suitable existing site
  • Could result in additional costs for example to secure the right land or building, or if
  • the service does not operate efficiently
 

This option:

  • Is low cost at $160,000 per year with potential to reduce over time as any future services start to create revenue
  • Provides more local options for the community to manage waste
  • Could track tonnes of waste diverted away from landfill

But:

  • Relies on both private transfer stations to continue to operate in Te Awamutu and Cambridge
  • Assumes transfer stations have physical space and willingness to provide the recovery service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COST:

 

COST:

$2.1 million to purchase or lease an existing site and prepare it for the service.

Plus operating costs of $649,605

$1.4m of external funding is expected

 

$3.4 million capital 

Plus operating costs of $649,605

$1.4m of external funding is expected

impact on rates:

 

impact on rates:

$195,181 per annum from year 5 onwards

 

$251,143 per annum from year 5 onwards

Impact on debt:

 

Impact on debt:

$696,980

 

$2,042,865

In summary:

 

In summary:

For this option we would work with a community organisation, charitable group or iwi partner to set up a resource recovery centre in an existing building (with fencing and concrete) on an industrial or commercial site.

 

This option is similar to option 3, except that we would build a facility from scratch. This drives the capital costs up to source the right piece of land and then construct a purpose-built facility.

 

 

PREFERRED OPTION

We prefer OPTION 3.

We prefer option three where we could develop a resource recovery centre in Waipā on an existing site with a building already in place. The upfront investment would be reduced as a site could be leased, either from Council or privately. It also reduces risk as the resource recovery centre could be moved to a different site in the future if it had to.

 

WE'VE HEARD

We should be aiming for what they are achieving in Raglan Xtreme Zero Waste. The centre there is absolutely amazing!!
A resource recovery centre would be great for the district, it would help to defer even more waste from landfill and help achieve long term goals towards reducing waste.
As an avid recycler, I would love to be able to recycle more things so I think this idea is brilliant!

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Do you support our proposal for a Resource Recovery Centre?

(please drag the arrow to indicate your selection)

Hate it

(Strongly disagree)

Could be worse

(Disagree)

On the fence

(Neutral)

I like it

(Agree)

Love it

(Strongly agree)

We want to hear your thoughts on the proposed options! Select your preference from the options below:

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Waipa District Council
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Te Awamutu, 3840
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